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Developing Superiority For Goalscoring Positions | Jed Davies | Video

Developing Superiority For Goalscoring Positions | Jed Davies | Video

Jed Davies | UEFA ‘B’ License Coach | @TPIMBW

To be superior...(in the balance of the moment)

Qualitative Superiority: Individual quality in the moment. Ability to jump, to time your movement, to header for any aerial finish. Ability to complete the physical, technical, psychological and tactical elements of the moment. Typically thought about as a duel between two players.

 

Numerical Superiority: Typically considered in the content of an area of play and the numbers of players who are effective in the key area of play: in simple terms it could be that we have three attackers against two defenders in an area of play.

 

Positional Superiority: Players have taken up better positions that the opponent for the desirable outcome of the moment: Scoring, secondary actions, penetration, retaining possession and so on. This could refer to the positions and the spaces you wish your players to fill upon crossing scenarios for example. 7

Might also refer to forcing your opponent into a worse position – for you to take up a better position.

Developing Superiority For Goalscoring Positions

“John Bilton has done research on ‘the Gold Zone’ so, for example with Germany in the 2014 World Cup, 88% were scored from in the gold section”

Video Transcript

The first thing I want to look at is this idea of developing superiority in goal scoring positions. I think this is taken from a Norwegian FA paper. Loads of people have different ways to break up the box as to where goals come from but I consider that anywhere within there [refers to the graphic on the slide] should be a goal scoring position. That goal box in the middle, someone mentioned John Bilton, well John Bilton has done research on ‘the Gold Zone’ so, for example with Germany in the 2014 World Cup, 88% were scored from in the gold section. The rest of this presentation, the context of it, will be about how you want to get the ball into that area to try and score goals. The closer you are and the more central the more likely you are to score.

To be superior and what does that mean? I’ve called it the balance of the moment. The moment might be me against Kieran and that balance has a number of different components to it. It might be that Cahill or Crouch or Walcott, for me they all have qualitative superiority. Terminology doesn’t really matter but it’s the idea that technically and physically they are better than their opponent, in 1v1 for example.

[Refers to video clip] This Chile against the Netherlands and this is the idea of numerical superiority in key areas. So, areas around the goal scoring positions. The second clip is from Estonia. A lot of people have got these statistics of crosses saying that they are useless and that you shouldn’t be doing it but this idea that if you have superiority in terms of numbers in boxes is one where people would say a cross is applicable. This is a critical analysis suggesting that the player should get his head up and look for crosses.

The third type of superiority is positional superiority. Players have taken up better positions in that moment. It might be attacking principles, it might be scoring goals, or it might be forcing your opponent into a worse position with the ball and you taking up a better position.

This clip is from a presentation filmed at our Dec 2015 event at Mile End Road, London.